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Foreword by Harvey V. Fineberg, President of the Institute of Medicine

For decades, experts have puzzled over why the US spends more on health care but suffers poorer outcomes than other industrialized nations. Now Elizabeth H. Bradley and Lauren A. Taylor marshal extensive research, including a comparative study of health care data from thirty countries, and get to the root of this paradox: We’ve left out of our tally the most impactful expenditures countries make to improve the health of their populations—investments in social services.

In The American Health Care Paradox, Bradley and Taylor illuminate how narrow definitions of “health care,” archaic divisions in the distribution of health and social services, and our allergy to government programs combine to create needless suffering in individual lives, even as health care spending continues to soar. They show us how and why the US health care “system” developed as it did; examine the constraints on, and possibilities for, reform; and profile inspiring new initiatives from around the world.

Offering a unique and clarifying perspective on the problems the Affordable Care Act won’t solve, this book also points a new way forward.

As a toast to success, a drowning of sorrows, a rite of passage, and the fuel for most social activities, alcohol plays a central role in our culture. Alcohol generates nearly $160 billion in US revenues annually and is a major source of tax revenue, making the stakes in the modern debate over its use, misuse, and regulation staggeringly high. Factor in the costs of alcohol-related illness and addiction, alcohol-related deaths, evolving social mores, legal precedents, and increasingly aggressive advertising and marketing and an already controversial subject becomes a heated, vigorous, and complicated battle.

Synthesizing the divergent, interdisciplinary perspectives on alcohol sales, regulation, and consumption into a cohesive whole, Social and Economic Control of Alcohol: The 21st Amendment in the 21st Century draws on the expertise of key academic and legal figures to become the seminal volume in this burgeoning field of inquiry. Amidst a rapidly changing milieu of regulations, cultures, and emotions, it objectively re-examines issues surrounding the regulation and sale of alcohol with unparalleled breadth, depth, and unbiased focus.

The book examines the foundation and basis for our current regulatory policy and how that foundation has shifted dramatically with changes in the law, marketing, consumer influence, and the impact of alcohol on society. With strong and relevant comparisons to historical studies and evaluations of past legislation, this book presents a critical analysis and definition of concepts and applications regarding alcohol control.

Double-blind, peer-reviewed contributions outline specific concerns related to the development of new laws and policies, and consider how those policies may affect individuals, organizations, law, and society in general. Highlighting current findings and trends, this volume allows for a better understanding of the potential correlation and causal relationship between regulation, sales, and consumption patterns.

Moneyball meets medicine in this remarkable chronicle of one of the greatest scientific quests of our time and the visionary mastermind behind it.

Medical doctor and economist Christopher Murray began the Global Burden of Disease study to gain a truer understanding of how we live and how we die. While it is one of the largest scientific projects ever attempted—as breathtaking as the first moon landing or the Human Genome Project—the questions it answers are meaningful for every one of us: What are the world's health problems? Who do they hurt? How much? Where? Why?

Murray argues that the ideal existence isn't simply the longest, but the one lived well and with the least illness. Until we can accurately measure global health issues, we cannot understand what makes us sick or do much to improve it. Challenging the accepted wisdom of the WHO and the UN, the charismatic and controversial health maverick has made enemies—as well as some influential friends, including Bill Gates who gave Murray a $100 million grant.

Told with novelistic verve by acclaimed journalist Jeremy N. Smith, the story of Murray's lifelong determination to understand how we live and die encompasses wars and famines, presidents and activists, billionaires and billions of people worldwide living in poverty. It shows the human side of scientific revolutions and of revolutionary scientists—their breakthroughs and setbacks, their genius and their flaws, their champions and their critics—as they strive to bring the news of their findings to the world. This transformational effort is far from over, but the story of its genesis and impact is already an epic tale.

Today, as never before, healthcare has the ability to enhance the quality and duration of life. At the same time, healthcare has become so costly that it can easily bankrupt governments and impoverish individuals and families.

Health services research is a highly multidisciplinary field, including such areas as health administration, health economics, medical sociology, medicine, , political science, public health, and public policy. The Encyclopedia of Health Services Research is the first single reference source to capture the diversity and complexity of the field. With more than 400 entries, these two volumes investigate the relationship between the factors of cost, quality, and access to healthcare and their impact upon medical outcomes such as death, disability, disease, discomfort, and dissatisfaction with care.

Key Features

  • Examines the growing healthcare crisis facing the United States
  • Encompasses the structure, process, and outcomes of healthcare
  • Aims to improve the equity, efficiency, effectiveness, and safety of healthcare by influencing and developing public policies
  • Describes healthcare systems and issues from around the globe

Key Themes

  • Access to Care
  • Accreditation, Associations, Foundations, and Research Organizations
  • Biographies of Current and Past Leaders
  • Cost of Care, Economics, Finance, and Payment Mechanisms
  • Disease, Disability, Health, and Health Behavior
  • Government and International Healthcare Organizations
  • Health Insurance
  • Health Professionals and Healthcare Organizations
  • Health Services Research
  • Laws, Regulations, and Ethics
  • Measurement; Data Sources and Coding; and Research Methods
  • Outcomes of Care
  • Policy Issues, Healthcare Reform, and International Comparisons
  • Public Health
  • Quality and Safety of Care
  • Special and Vulnerable Groups

The Encyclopedia is designed to be an introduction to the various topics of health services research for an audience including undergraduate students, graduate students, andgeneral readers seeking non-technical descriptions of the field and its practices. It is also useful for healthcare practitioners wishing to stay abreast of the changes and updates in the field.

Although the use of new health technologies in healthcare and medicine is generally seen as beneficial, there has been little analysis of the impact of such technologies on people’s lives and understandings of health and illness. This ground-breaking book explores how new technologies not only provide hope for cure and well-being, but also introduce new ethical dilemmas and raise questions about the 'natural' body.

Focusing on the ways new health technologies intervene into our lives and affect our ideas about normalcy, the body and identity, Medical Technologies and the Life World explores:

  • how new health technologies are understood by lay people and patients
  • how the outcomes of these technologies are communicated in various clinical settings
  • how these technologies can alter our notions of health and illness and create ‘new illness’.

Written by authors with differing backgrounds in phenomenology, social psychology, social anthropology, communication studies and the nursing sciences, this sensational text is essential reading for students and academics of medical sociology, health and allied studies, and anyone with an interest in new health technologies.