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How do new diseases become part of the public health agenda? Emerging Illnesses and Society brings together historians, sociologists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and others to explore this vital issue. Contributors describe the processes by which patients' groups interact with medical researchers, public health institutions, and the media to identify and address previously unknown illnesses, including multiple sclerosis, Tourette syndrome, AIDS, lead poisoning, Lyme disease, and hepatitis C. The introductory chapter develops a general theoretical model of the social process of "emerging"illness, identifying critical epidemiologic, social and political factors that shape different trajectories toward the construction of public health priorities. Through case studies of individual diseases and analyses of public awareness campaigns and institutional responses, this timely volume provides important insights into the medical, social, and economic factors that determine why some illnesses receive more attention and funding than others.

Contributors: Deborah Barrett, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Steven Epstein, University of California, San Diego; Phyllis Freeman, University of Massachusetts, Boston; Diane E. Goldstein, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Peter J. Krause, University of Connecticut School of Medicine; Howard I. Kushner, Emory University; Lawrence D. Mass, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York; Michelle Murphy, University of Toronto; Lydia Ogden, Global AIDS Program, CDCR; Sandy Smith-Nonini, Elon University; Ellen Griffith Spears, Southern Regional Council; Andrew Spielman, Harvard School of Public Health; Colin Talley, University of California San Francisco; Sam R. Telford III, Harvard School of Public Health; Christian Warren, New York Academy of Medicine.

Against the backdrop of unprecedented concern for the future of health care, this Very Short Introduction surveys the history of medicine from classical times to the present. Focussing on the key turning points in the history of Western medicine, such as the advent of hospitals and the rise of experimental medicine, Bill Bynum offers insights into medicine's past, while at the same time engaging with contemporary issues, discoveries, and controversies. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

The issues constituting the history of medicine are consequential: how societies organize health care, how individuals or states relate to sickness, how we understand our own identity and agency as sufferers or healers. In Locating Medical History: The Stories and Their Meanings, Frank Huisman, John Harley Warner, and other eminent historians explore and reflect on a field that accommodates a remarkable diversity of practitioners and approaches.

At a time when medical history is facing profound choices about its future, these scholars explore the discipline in the distant and recent past in order to rethink its missions and methods today. They discuss such issues as the periodic estrangement of medical history from medicine, the influence of Foucault on the writing of medical history, and the shifts from social to cultural history and back again. Chapters explore the early history of the field, its transformations since the 1970s, and its prospects for the future.

With diverse constituencies, a multiplicity of approaches, styles, and aims is both expected and desired. This volume locates medical history within itself and within larger historiographic trends, to provide a springboard for discussions about what the history of medicine should be, and what aims it should serve.

Contributors: Olga Amsterdamska, University of Amsterdam; Warwick Anderson, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Allan M. Brandt, Harvard Medical School; Theodore M. Brown, University of Rochester; Roger Cooter, University College London; Martin Dinges, Institut für Geschichte der Medizin der Robert Bosch Stiftung; Alice Domurat Dreger, Michigan State University; Jacalyn Duffin, Queen's University; Elizabeth Fee, National Library of Medicine; Mary E. Fissell, The Johns Hopkins University; Danielle Gourevitch, École Pratique des Hautes Études; Anja Hiddinga, University of Amsterdam; Ludmilla Jordanova, University of East Anglia; Alfons Labisch, Heinrich-Heine-University; Hans-Uwe Lammel, University of Rostock; Sherwin B. Nuland, Yale University; Vivian Nutton, University College London; Roy Porter, formerly University College London; Susan M. Reverby. Wellesley College; David Rosner, Columbia University; Thomas Rütten, University of Newcastle upon Tyne; Heinz-Peter Schmiedebach, University of Greifswald; Christiane Sinding, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale

Medizin / Ausbildung / Geschichte.

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. Henrietta's cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can't afford health insurance. This phenomenal New York Times bestseller tells a riveting story of the collision between ethics, race, and medicine; of scientific discovery and faith healing; and of a daughter consumed with questions about the mother she never knew.

Against the backdrop of unprecedented concern for the future of health care, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Medicine surveys the rise of medicine in the West from classical times to the present. Covering both the social and scientific history of medicine, this lavishly illustrated volume traces the chronology of key developments and events, while at the same time engaging with the issues, discoveries, and controversies that have beset and characterized medical progress. The authors weave a narrative that connects disease, doctors, primary care, surgery, the rise of hospitals, drug treatment and pharmacology, mental illness and psychiatry. This volume emphasizes the crucial developments of the past 150 years, but also examines classical, medieval, and Islamic and East Asian medicine. Authoritative and accessible, The Cambridge Illustrated History of Medicine is for readers wanting a lively and informative introduction to medical history. Roy Porter is professor of the social history of medicine at the Wellcome Insitute for the History of Science. He has written or edited numerous books about the history of medicine, including Western Medical Tradition (with L. Conrad, Cambridge, 1995), Drugs and Narcotics in History (with M. Teich, Cambridge, 1995), The Greatest Benefit to Mankind (Norton, 1999), and The Creation of the Modern World (Norton, 2000).

This collection of essays focuses on the ways in which Greek and Latin authors viewed and wrote about the history of medicine in the ancient world. Special attention is given to medical doxography, i.e. the description of the characteristic doctrines of the great medical authorities of the past. The volume examines the various attitudes to the history of medicine adopted by a wide range of ancient writers (e.g. Aristotle, Galen, Celsus, Herophilus, Soranus, Oribasius, Caelius Aurelianus). It discusses the historical sense of ancient medicine, the variety of versions of the medical past that were created and the wide range of purposes and strategies which medico-historical writing served. It also deals with the question of the sources, the role of historiographical traditions and the variety of literary genres of ancient medico-historical writing.

In this work, the author contributes to our understanding of the formation of medicine as a university discipline by explaining how a collection of medical works known as the "Ars medicine" ("The Art of Medicine") came to form the basis of medical teaching in the early universities. Based upon extensive manuscript research, this study explains how the collection evolved to suit the needs of university medical teaching and how it helped to establish Hippocratic-Galenic medicine as the new medical othodoxy. Focusing upon the medical faculty at the University of Paris, the book investigates how medical texts were produced, who owned them and how they were used in the classroom. It thus explains how language was used, how textual authority was created and utilized, and how text-based knowledge was sanctioned in the classroom.