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The six chapters and fifteen cases contained in this book challenge students to ask the appropriate questions and stimulate their thinking about public health leadership and management. The situations presented by each case are vivid and provide not only a basis for practicing professional public health judgements but also provide a lasting impression that aids in retention of the lessons learned.

The U.S. health care system is in crisis. At stake are the quality of care for millions of Americans and the financial well-being of individuals and employers squeezed by skyrocketing premiums—not to mention the stability of state and federal government budgets.

In Redefining Health Care, internationally renowned strategy expert Michael Porter and innovation expert Elizabeth Teisberg reveal the underlying—and largely overlooked—causes of the problem, and provide a powerful prescription for change.

The authors argue that competition currently takes place at the wrong level—among health plans, networks, and hospitals—rather than where it matters most, in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of specific health conditions. Participants in the system accumulate bargaining power and shift costs in a zero-sum competition, rather than creating value for patients. Based on an exhaustive study of the U.S. health care system, Redefining Health Care lays out a breakthrough framework for redefining the way competition in health care delivery takes place—and unleashing stunning improvements in quality and efficiency.

With specific recommendations for hospitals, doctors, health plans, employers, and policy makers, this book shows how to move health care toward positive-sum competition that delivers lasting benefits for all.

Glycemic Control in the Hospitalized Patient: A Comprehensive Clinical Guide is a unique, practical resource for health care providers dealing with hyperglycemia in the inpatient setting. Outlining a hands-on approach used by the Duke University Inpatient Diabetes Management team, the book discusses a wide range of scenarios that occur while treating patients with hyperglycemia, including challenging circumstances such as steroids and tube feeding regimens. Special emphasis is given to insulin therapy. The chapters are written by a group of health care providers with extensive, pioneering experience in hyperglycemia control in the inpatient setting at the Duke University Medical Center. The book includes the most up-to-date scientific evidence and information and is addressed to not only hospitalists and general internists but also endocrinology fellows, residents, nurse practitioners, nurses, and other primary care practitioners who treat patients in the inpatient setting. The focus is clearly on practical, patient-care topics. Glycemic Control in the Hospitalized Patient: A Comprehensive Clinical Guide is a first-of-its kind, comprehensive guide to state-of-the-art inpatient glycemic management.

After reviewing the growth of health care spending and the causes of that growth, Enthoven (health policy, international studies, and public and private management, Stanford) sets out elements of the fundamental reform he finds necessary to solve the problem. Primarily that involves freer choice for

In both rich and poor nations, public resources for health care are inadequate to meet demand. Policy makers and health care providers must determine how to provide the most effective health care to citizens using the limited resources that are available. This chapter describes current and future challenges in the delivery of health care, and outlines the role that operations research (OR) models can play in helping to solve those problems. The chapter concludes with an overview of this book – its intended audience, the areas covered, and a description of the subsequent chapters. KEY WORDS Health care delivery, Health care planning HEALTH CARE DELIVERY: PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES 3 1.1 WORLDWIDE HEALTH: THE PAST 50 YEARS Human health has improved significantly in the last 50 years. In 1950, global life expectancy was 46 years [1]. That figure rose to 61 years by 1980 and to 67 years by 1998 [2]. Much of these gains occurred in low- and middle-income countries, and were due in large part to improved nutrition and sanitation, medical innovations, and improvements in public health infrastructure.