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Fully updated in this new edition, Health Care Politics and Policy in America combines a historical overview of U.S. health policy and programs with analysis of current trends and reform efforts.

The book
-- shows how health policy fits into the larger social, economic, political, and ideological environment of the United States;
-- identifies the roles played by both public and private, institutional and individual actors in shaping the health care system at all levels;
-- considers the trade-offs inherent in various policy choices and their impacts on different social groups;
-- takes account of the dynamic impact of technological change on health care capacities, costs, and ethics.

This edition includes expanded discussion of equity issues and whether there is a "right" to health care, and a new chapter on the issue of medical liability. The concluding chapter brings the story of health care policy up to the end of the millennium, with particular attention to the managed care revolution and reaction to it.

The book equips readers with the basic tools for drawing more informed judgments in the ongoing debate about health care policy in the United States.

As health care concerns grow in the U.S., medical anthropologist Linda M. Whiteford and social psychologist Larry G. Branch present their findings on a health care anomaly, from an unlikely source. Primary Health Care in Cuba examines the highly successful model of primary health care in Cuba following the 1959 Cuban Revolution. This model, developed during a time of dramatic social and political change, created a preventive care system to better provide equity access to health care. Cuba's recognition as a paragon of health care has earned praise from the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the Pan American Health Organization. In this book, Whiteford and Branch explore the successes of Cuba's preventive primary health care system and its contribution to global health.

In recent years, bitter partisan disputes have erupted over Medicare reform. Democrats and Republicans have fiercely contested issues such as prescription drug coverage and how to finance Medicare to absorb the baby boomers. As Jonathan Oberlander demonstrates in The Political Life of Medicare, these developments herald the reopening of a historic debate over Medicare's fundamental purpose and structure. Revealing how Medicare politics and policies have developed since Medicare's enactment in 1965 and what the program's future holds, Oberlander's timely and accessible analysis will interest anyone concerned with American politics and public policy, health care politics, aging, and the welfare state.

In 1965, the United States government enacted legislation to provide low-income individuals with quality health care and related services. Initially viewed as the friendless stepchild of Medicare, Medicaid has grown exponentially since its inception, becoming a formidable force of its own. Funded jointly by the national government and each of the fifty states, the program is now the fourth most expensive item in the federal budget and the second largest category of spending for almost every state. Now, under the new, historic health care reform legislation, Medicaid is scheduled to include sixteen million more people.

Laura Katz Olson, an expert on health, aging, and long-term care policy, unravels the multifaceted and perplexing puzzle of Medicaid with respect to those who invest in and benefit from the program. Assessing the social, political, and economic dynamics that have shaped Medicaid for almost half a century, she helps readers of all backgrounds understand the entrenched and powerful interests woven into the system that have been instrumental in swelling costs and holding elected officials hostage. Addressing such fundamental questions as whether patients receive good care and whether Medicaid meets the needs of the low-income population it is supposed to serve, Olson evaluates the extent to which the program is an appropriate foundation for health care reform.

Delivering the most detailed and exhaustive content available, market-leading HEALTH CARE ECONOMICS, 7th Edition demonstrates how basic economic concepts, principles, and theories can be used to think about and illustrate various health care issues. This introductory economics text is geared toward graduate students who will be medical and health services managers, administrators, or executives. The seventh edition of HEALTH CARE ECONOMICS includes recent data on the medical sector, updated figures and tables, the latest information on legislative changes affecting this industry, and new literature and research. It also provides an insightful historical perspective within which these changes are occurring.
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This Text Strikes The Necessary Balance Of Population-Based Health Economics And The More Traditional, Market-Oriented Approach To Health Care Economics. The Fifth Edition Provides The Necessary Tools To Develop A Systematic And Disciplined Approach For Solving Economic Problems In A Health Care Context While Learning The Importance Of Being Able To Identify, Define, Measure, Explain, And Predict Certain Economic Phenomena And Evaluate The Relevance Of End Results. Fundamental, Yet Comprehensive In Coverage, The Focus Is On How To Think About Economic Problems In A Systematic Way--Using The Three Major Tasks Of Economics--Descriptive Economics, Explanatory Economics, And Evaluative Economics.