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Emphasizing the importance of social context and cultural construction, Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health examines current issues in health from a social and behavioral sciences perspective. The book uses a social ecological framework to address multilevel influences on health and enlarge the dominant "risk factor" approach to health behavior. Editor Jeannine Coreil and contributing authors use examples from the forefront of public health to illustrate the relevance of “core“competencies” in the field to diverse real-world problems. The Second Edition has been thoroughly updated and revised throughout, based on user feedback, and includes new theory, research, case studies.

Key Features:

  • Applies the social ecology of health model to contemporary issues at the individual and group level
  • Draws from a wide range of disciplines, including medical sociology, health psychology, medical anthropology, demography, gerontology, and economics
  • Describes planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health programs, policies, and interventions
  • Features engaging case studies and examples on topics such as HIV/AIDS and breast cancer
  • Includes new “Special Topics” section, with chapters on childhood obesity, injury prevention, and occupational health
  • Offers practical advice for students and practitioners interested in updating their knowledge and skills”


Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health is intended as a core textbook for graduate courses in public health and health care management that examine current issues in health from a social and behavioral sciences perspective.

How do new diseases become part of the public health agenda? Emerging Illnesses and Society brings together historians, sociologists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and others to explore this vital issue. Contributors describe the processes by which patients' groups interact with medical researchers, public health institutions, and the media to identify and address previously unknown illnesses, including multiple sclerosis, Tourette syndrome, AIDS, lead poisoning, Lyme disease, and hepatitis C. The introductory chapter develops a general theoretical model of the social process of "emerging"illness, identifying critical epidemiologic, social and political factors that shape different trajectories toward the construction of public health priorities. Through case studies of individual diseases and analyses of public awareness campaigns and institutional responses, this timely volume provides important insights into the medical, social, and economic factors that determine why some illnesses receive more attention and funding than others.

Contributors: Deborah Barrett, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Steven Epstein, University of California, San Diego; Phyllis Freeman, University of Massachusetts, Boston; Diane E. Goldstein, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Peter J. Krause, University of Connecticut School of Medicine; Howard I. Kushner, Emory University; Lawrence D. Mass, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York; Michelle Murphy, University of Toronto; Lydia Ogden, Global AIDS Program, CDCR; Sandy Smith-Nonini, Elon University; Ellen Griffith Spears, Southern Regional Council; Andrew Spielman, Harvard School of Public Health; Colin Talley, University of California San Francisco; Sam R. Telford III, Harvard School of Public Health; Christian Warren, New York Academy of Medicine.

Fully revised and updated for the third edition, the Oxford Handbook of Public Health Practice remains the first resort for all those working in this broad field. Structured to assist with practical tasks, translating evidence into policy, and providing concise summaries and real-world issues from across the globe, this literally provides a world of experience at your fingertips. Easy-to-use, concise and practical, it is structured into seven parts that focus on the vital areas of assessment, data and information, direct action, policy, health-care systems, personal effectiveness and organisational development. Reflecting recent advances, the most promising developments in practical public health are presented, as well as maintaining essential summaries of core disciplines. This handbook is designed to assist students and practitioners around the world, for improved management of disasters, epidemics, health behaviour, acute and chronic disease prevention, community and government action, environmental health, vulnerable populations, and more.

New Edition Available Covering the basic structures and operations of the U.S. health system, this condensed distillation of the important topics covered in Delivering Health Care in America is the perfect resource for courses in health policy, allied health, health administration and more. It clarifies the complexities of health care organization and finance and presents a solid overview of how the various components fit together. The Second Edition of Essentials of the US Health Care System has been updated to include new data, charts, tables and accompanying information throughout the book. Use as a stand-alone text, or a supplement in various courses. New content includes: Medicare, Medicaid and SCHIP. Ongoing evolution in U.S. health care as a result of corporatization and globalization. The role of hospitalists. Updated content on Parts C and D of Medicare. including information on high-deductible health plans/health savings accounts as an insurance option. Updated content on primary care and community oriented health care development Current development on hospital extensions to the community. Current development on nano technology. Current health policy issues. Current discussion on healthcare reforms, including future challenges posed by the increased need for long-term care. New Third Edition Now Available!

As health care concerns grow in the U.S., medical anthropologist Linda M. Whiteford and social psychologist Larry G. Branch present their findings on a health care anomaly, from an unlikely source. Primary Health Care in Cuba examines the highly successful model of primary health care in Cuba following the 1959 Cuban Revolution. This model, developed during a time of dramatic social and political change, created a preventive care system to better provide equity access to health care. Cuba's recognition as a paragon of health care has earned praise from the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and the Pan American Health Organization. In this book, Whiteford and Branch explore the successes of Cuba's preventive primary health care system and its contribution to global health.

For fifty years, Medicare and Medicaid have stood at the center of a contentious debate surrounding American government, citizenship, and health care entitlement. In Medicare and Medicaid at 50, leading scholars in politics, government, economics, health policy, and history offer a comprehensive assessment of the evolution of these programs and their impact on society -- from their origins in the Great Society era to the current battles over the Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare").

These highly accessible essays examine Medicare and Medicaid from their origins as programs for the elderly and poor to their later role as a safety net for the middle class. Along the way, they have served as touchstones for heated debates about economics, social welfare, and the role of government.

Medicare and Medicaid at 50 addresses key questions for understanding the past and future of health policy in America, including:

· What were the origins for these initiatives, and how were they transformed over time?
· What marks have Medicare and Medicaid left on society?
· In what ways have these programs produced innovation, even in eras of retrenchment?
· How did Medicaid, once regarded as a poor person's program, expand its benefits and coverage over the decades to become the platform for the ACA's future expansion?

The volume's contributors go on to examine the powerful role of courts in these transformations, along with the shifting roles of Congress, public opinion, and state governors in the programs' ongoing evolution.

From Lyndon Johnson to Barack Obama on the left, and from Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush on the right, American political leaders have tied their political fortunes to the fate of America's entitlement programs; Medicare and Medicaid at 50 helps explain why, and how those ongoing debates are likely to shape the future of the Affordable Care Act.

Healthcare Kaizen focuses on the principles and methods of daily continuous improvement, or Kaizen, for healthcare professionals and organizations. Kaizen is a Japanese word that means "change for the better," as popularized by Masaaki Imai in his 1986 book Kaizen: The Key to Japan’s Competitive Success and through the books of Norman Bodek, both of whom contributed introductory material for this book.

Winner of a 2013 Shingo Research and Professional Publication Award!

In 1989, Dr. Donald M. Berwick, founder of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and former administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, endorsed the principles of Kaizen in the New England Journal of Medicine, describing it as "the continuous search for opportunities for all processes to get better." This book shows how to make this goal a reality.

Healthcare Kaizen shares some of the methods used by numerous hospitals around the world, including Franciscan St. Francis Health, where co-author Joe Swartz has led these efforts. Most importantly, the book covers the management mindsets and philosophies required to make Kaizen work effectively in a hospital department or as an organization-wide program.

All of the examples in the book were shared by leading healthcare organizations, with over 200 full-color pictures and visual illustrations of Kaizen-based improvements that were initiated by nurses, physicians, housekeepers, senior executives and other staff members at all levels.

Healthcare Kaizen will be helpful for organizations that have embraced weeklong improvement events, but now want to follow the lead of ThedaCare, Virginia Mason Medical Center, and others who have moved beyond just doing events into a more complete management system based on Lean or the Toyota Production System.

It’s often said, without much reflection, that people hate change. The experiences shared in this book prove that people actually love change when they are fully engaged in the process, get to make improvements that improve patient care and make their day less frustrating, and when they don’t fear being laid off as a result of their improvements.

Mark Graban explains why his new book Healthcare Kaizen is a great resource for healthcare organizations looking to make improvements on the frontlines.(www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4JdaH03Dbo&feature=youtu.be)

Check out a recent entry about this book on the Virginia Mason Medical Center Blog, Could this new book help drive your Lean journey? (https://virginiamasonblog.org/2012/09/05/could-this-new-book-help-drive-your-lean-journey/)

Check out what the experts at the Franciscan St. Francis Health System have to say about Healthcare Kaizen. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcGmP5gLEPo&feature=c4-overview&list=UU7jiTxn4nkMzOE5eTbf0Upw

Health Care Administration: Managing Organized Delivery Systems, Fifth Edition provides graduate and pre-professional students with a comprehensive, detailed overview of the numerous facets of the modern healthcare system, focusing on functions and operations at both the corporate and hospital level. The Fifth Edition of this authoritative text comprises several new subjects, including new chapters on patient safety and ambulatory care center design and planning. Other updated topics include healthcare information systems, management of nursing systems, labor and employment law, and financial management, as well discussions on current healthcare policy in the United States. Health Care Administration: Managing Organized Delivery Systems, Fifth Edition continues to be one of the most effective teaching texts in the field, addressing operational, technical and organizational matters along with the day-to-day responsibilities of hospital administrators. Broad in scope, this essential text has now evolved to offer the most up-to-date, comprehensive treatment of the organizational functions of today's complex and ever-changing healthcare delivery system.

The definitive story of American health care today--its causes, consequences, and confusions

In March 2010, the Affordable Care Act was signed into law. It was the most extensive reform of America’s health care system since at least the creation of Medicare in 1965, and maybe ever. The ACA was controversial and highly political, and the law faced legal challenges reaching all the way to the Supreme Court; it even precipitated a government shutdown. It was a signature piece of legislation for President Obama’s first term, and also a ball and chain for his second.

Ezekiel J. Emanuel, a professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania who also served as a special adviser to the White House on health care reform, has written a brilliant diagnostic explanation of why health care in America has become such a divisive social issue, how money and medicine have their own--quite distinct--American story, and why reform has bedeviled presidents of the left and right for more than one hundred years.
Emanuel also explains exactly how the ACA reforms are reshaping the health care system now. He forecasts the future, identifying six mega trends in health that will determine the market for health care to 2020 and beyond. His predictions are bold, provocative, and uniquely well-informed. Health care--one of America’s largest employment sectors, with an economy the size of the GDP of France--has never had a more comprehensive or authoritative interpreter.

In 1998, health expenditures in the United States accounted for 12.9% of national income-the highest share of income devoted to health in the developed world. The United States also spends more on medical research than any other country-in 2000, the federal government dedicated $18.4 billion to it, compared with only $3.7 billion for the entire European Union. In this book, leading health economists ask whether we are getting our money's worth.

From an economic perspective, they find, the answer is a resounding "yes": in fact, considering the extraordinary value of improvements to health, we may even be spending too little on medical research. The evidence these papers present and the conclusions they reach are both surprising and convincing: that growth in longevity since 1950 has been as valuable as growth in all other forms of consumption combined; that medical advances producing 10% reductions in mortality from cancer and heart disease alone would add roughly $10 trillion-a year's GDP-to the national wealth; or that the average new drug approved by the FDA yields benefits worth many times its cost of development.

The papers in this book are packed with these and many other surprising revelations, their sophisticated analysis persuasively demonstrating the massive economic benefits we can gain from investments in medical research. For anyone concerned about the cost and the value of such research-from policy makers to health care professionals and economists-this will be a landmark book.