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Knowledge Translation in Health Care is a practical introduction to knowledge translation for everyone working and learning within health policy and funding agencies, and as researchers, clinicians and trainees. Using everyday examples, it explains how to use research findings to improve health care in real life.

This new second edition defines the principles and practice of knowledge translation and outlines strategies for successful knowledge translation in practice and policy making. It includes relevant real world examples and cases of knowledge translation in action that are accessible and relevant for all stakeholders including clinicians, health policy makers, administrators, managers, researchers, clinicians and trainees. 

From an international expert editor and contributor team, and fully revised to reflect current practice and latest developments within the field, Knowledge Translation in Health Care is the practical guide for all health policy makers and researchers, clinicians, trainee clinicians, medical students and other healthcare professionals seeking to improve healthcare practice.

Decision making in health care means navigating through a complex and tangled web of diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainties, patient preferences and values, and costs. In addition, medical therapies may include side effects, surgery may lead to undesirable complications, and diagnostic technologies may produce inconclusive results. In many clinical and health policy decisions it is necessary to counterbalance benefits and risks, and to trade off competing objectives such as maximizing life expectancy vs optimizing quality of life vs minimizing the required resources. This textbook plots a clear course through these complex and conflicting variables. It clearly explains and illustrates tools for integrating quantitative evidence-based data and subjective outcome values in making clinical and health policy decisions. An accompanying CD-ROM features solutions to the exercises, PowerPoint® presentations of the illustrations, and sample models and tables.

Changing the U.S. Health Care System

The third edition of "Changing the U.S. Health Care System" is a thoroughly revised and updated compendium of the most current thought on three key components of health care policy: improving access, ensuring quality, and controlling costs. Written by a panel of health care policy experts, this third edition highlights the most recent research relevant to health policy and management issues.

New chapters address topics such as the disparities in health and in health care, information systems, and performance in the area of nursing. Revisions to chapters from the previous edition emphasize the most recent developments in the field.

For more than ten years, "Changing the U.S. Health Care System" has provided a comprehensive, single-source account of the issues of most concern to health care policy and management students, health services researchers and policy analysts, health care managers, practitioners, and providers.

Americans praise medical technology for saving lives and improving health. Yet, new technology is often cited as a key factor in skyrocketing medical costs.

This volume, second in the Medical Innovation at the Crossroads series, examines how economic incentives for innovation are changing and what that means for the future of health care.

Up-to-date with a wide variety of examples and case studies, this book explores how payment, patent, and regulatory policies--as well as the involvement of numerous government agencies--affect the introduction and use of new pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and surgical procedures.

The volume also includes detailed comparisons of policies and patterns of technological innovation in Western Europe and Japan.

This fact-filled and practical book will be of interest to economists, policymakers, health administrators, health care practitioners, and the concerned public.

Based on the current climate of our nation’s finances and healthcare spending, it is clear that young doctors and medical students are likely to see a dramatic transformation of the manner in which America offers medical care to its citizens over the course of their careers. As such, it is pivotal that the next generation of America’s leaders on the front lines of medicine develop a sense of where healthcare has evolved from and future potential directions of change. An Introduction to Health Policy: A Primer for Physicians and Medical Students is the first of its kind: a book written by doctors for doctors in order to allow busy physicians and medical students to quickly develop an understanding of the key issues facing American healthcare. This book seeks to efficiently and effectively educate physicians and medical students in a clinical context that they can understand on the past, present, and potential future issues in healthcare policy and the evolution of American healthcare. The reader will walk away from the book with the ability to discuss the fundamental issues in American healthcare with ease.

Today, more than 75 percent of pharmaceutical drug trials in the United States are being conducted in the private sector. Once the sole province of academic researchers, these important studies are now being outsourced to non-academic physicians.

According to Jill A. Fisher, this major change in the way medical research is performed is the outcome of two problems in U.S. health care: decreasing revenue for physicians and decreasing access to treatment for patients. As physicians report diminishing income due to restrictive relationships with insurers, increasing malpractice insurance premiums, and inflated overhead costs to operate private practices, they are attracted to pharmaceutical contract research for its lucrative return. Clinical trials also provide limited medical access to individuals who have no or inadequate health insurance because they offer "free" doctors' visits, diagnostic tests, and medications to participants. Focusing on the professional roles of those involved, as well as key research practices, Fisher assesses the risks and advantages for physicians and patients alike when pharmaceutical drug studies are used as an alternative to standard medical care.

A volume in the Critical Issues in Health and Medicine series, edited by Rima D. Apple and Janet Golden

Leadership in Health Care is an authoritative and timely book that addresses the need for leading skilled and evidence based care within the context of a performance measured health service. The book offers invaluable support to those training to be health care professionals by identifying the breadth of leadership theory that they can apply to their own clinical practice. The authors also raise readers’ awareness of the need for innovation in order to deliver a quality health service to a society with increasingly demanding expectations. The book covers a range of issues that health care professionals will face, addressing leadership from individual, team, and organizational frameworks.

Until now, no textbook on TQ has emerged that was written specifically for the healthcare industry. The Textbook of TQ in Healthcare is the first true text prepared by healthcare professionals for healthcare professionals. It provides a discussion of the tools, techniques and principles of TQ. Academic programs will find this text very useful for courses in TQ, quality management, general and strategic management and leadership.The Textbook is also an excellent reference for students and professionals in medicine, nursing, allied health services, pharmacy and healthcare administration.
The Textbook of TQ in Healthcare starts with an introduction and history of TQ and its movement from the manufacturing sector to the healthcare industry. Quality is then discussed as a major cornerstone of the healthcare delivery system. Principles, methods for implementation and the tools for assessing TQ progress are described. The Textbook concludes with a section on comparative analysis of TQ with other management philosophies. Also presented are a case study of a major healthcare facility that has actually implemented TQ and an excellent collection of articles that further expand the understanding of TQ.

Our health care is staggeringly expensive, yet one in six Americans has no health insurance. We have some of the most skilled physicians in the world, yet one hundred thousand patients die each year from medical errors. In this gripping, eye-opening book, award-winning journalist Shannon Brownlee takes readers inside the hospital to dismantle some of our most venerated myths about American medicine. Brownlee dissects what she calls "the medical-industrial complex" and lays bare the backward economic incentives embedded in our system, revealing a stunning portrait of the care we now receive.
Nevertheless, Overtreated ultimately conveys a message of hope by reframing the debate over health care reform. It offers a way to control costs and cover the uninsured, while simultaneously improving the quality of American medicine. Shannon Brownlee's humane, intelligent, and penetrating analysis empowers readers to avoid the perils of overtreatment, as well as pointing the way to better health care for everyone.

Written by a groundbreaking figure of modern medical study, Tracking Medicine is an eye-opening introduction to the science of health care delivery, as well as a powerful argument for its relevance in shaping the future of our country. An indispensable resource for those involved in public health and health policy, this book uses Dr. Wennbergs pioneering research to provide a framework for understanding the health care crisis; and outlines a roadmap for real change in the future. It is also a useful tool for anyone interested in understanding and forming their own opinion on the current debate.