PDF Guide Free

Download PDF Guide Free

Igniting the Power of Community: The Role of CBOs and NGOs in Global Public Health introduces readers to the pursuit and potential of community-based organizations and nongovernmental organizations to transform global public health. At a time of unprecedented challenges, economic crises, social inequalities, environmental stressors, emerging health threats, these organizations are initiating and driving change, often being the first to call attention to the issues and increasingly forging significant and sustainable solutions.

Through concrete examples, success stories, and cautionary tales from experienced practitioners, Igniting the Power of Community demonstrates why understanding the roles of the diverse organizations of this sector is vital to anyone concerned with improving health and public health today. This forward-thinking book explains how citizen sector organizations work, their immediate and long term impact on public health, and the key players and business dynamics involved. With an emphasis on innovative approaches, it provides an "insiders view" into practical considerations regarding organizational structure, financing, and operations. A sampling of the coverage:

The new era of social entrepreneurship and philanthropy

Sustainability in international public health NGOs

Front-line perspectives from both well-established and grassroots CBOs

Faith-based organizations and public health

NGOs and the military: evolving relationships in conflict and disaster zones

Understanding the environmental health movement and its impact

Project YEAH: a youth AIDS organizations story.

Whether you are involved in clinical care, health research, public health programs, or policy development and implementation, this book provides key insights and skills, and will serve as an invaluable resource in working most effectively with and within these dynamic organizations.

body>

Statistics for Health Care Professionals: Working with Excel (second edition) is written in a clear, easily followed style keyed to the powerful statistical tool, Microsoft Excel 2007. It introduces the use of statistics applicable to health administration, health policy, public health, health information management, and other professions, emphasizing the logic of probability and statistical analysis in all areas. Coverage includes data acquisition, data display, basics of probability, data distributions, confidence limits and hypothesis testing, statistical tests for categorical data, tests for related and unrelated data, analysis of variance, simple linear regression, multiple regression, and analysis with a dichotomous categorical dependent variable. A glossary and section-by-section review questions round out this uniquely comprehensive and accessible text.

Each topical chapter in this volume crystallizes the findings of a five-year study, under the auspices of the Population Health Program of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, that probed the links between social hierarchy, the “macroenvironmental” factors in illness patterns, the quality of the “microenvironmental,” and other determinants of health. In its aggregate, this volume will prove essential to an understanding of the underlying public health issues for the next several decades.

Epidemiological Criminology: A Public Health Approach to Crime and Violence

Epidemiological Criminology offers an introduction to the sources and methods of epidemiological criminology and shows how to apply these methods to some of the most vexing problems now confronting researchers and practitioners in public health epidemiology, criminology, and criminal justice.

The book describes, explains, and applies the newly formulated practice of epidemiological criminology, an emerging discipline that finds the intersection across theories, methods, and statistical models of public health with their corresponding tools of criminal justice and criminology. The authors show how to apply epidemiological criminology as a practical tool to address population issues of violence and crime nationally and globally. In addition, they look at future directions and the application of this emerging field in corrections, public health and law, gangs and gang violence, victimology, mental health and substance abuse, environmental justice, international human rights, and global terrorism.

For students, the book presents an exciting approach to understanding epidemiology as a means with which to tackle some of the worst problems for vulnerable populations. For researchers and policymakers, the book offers a new methodological perspective that recognizes the significance of social disparities and the built environment as factors in the formulation of public health policy, and provides a tool with which to produce more effective interventions, preventive measures, and policy formulations.

Decision making in health care involves consideration of a complex set of diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic uncertainties. Medical therapies have side effects, surgical interventions may lead to complications, and diagnostic tests can produce misleading results. Furthermore, patient values and service costs must be considered. Decisions in clinical and health policy require careful weighing of risks and benefits and are commonly a trade-off of competing objectives: maximizing quality of life vs maximizing life expectancy vs minimizing the resources required. This text takes a proactive, systematic and rational approach to medical decision making. It covers decision trees, Bayesian revision, receiver operating characteristic curves, and cost-effectiveness analysis; as well as advanced topics such as Markov models, microsimulation, probabilistic sensitivity analysis and value of information analysis. It provides an essential resource for trainees and researchers involved in medical decision modelling, evidence-based medicine, clinical epidemiology, comparative effectiveness, public health, health economics, and health technology assessment.

Behavioral economics has potential to offer novel solutions to some of todays most pressing public health problems: How do we persuade people to eat healthy and lose weight? How can health professionals communicate health risks in a way that is heeded? How can food labeling be modified to inform healthy food choices? Behavioral Economics and Public Health is the first book to apply the groundbreaking insights of behavioral economics to the persisting problems of health behaviors and behavior change. In addition to providing a primer on the behavioral economics principles that are most relevant to public health, this book offers details on how these principles can be employed to mitigating the worlds greatest health threats, including obesity, smoking, risky sexual behavior, and excessive drinking. With contributions from an international team of scholars from psychology, economics, marketing, public health, and medicine, this book is a trailblazing new approach to the most difficult and important problems of our time.

In 1998, health expenditures in the United States accounted for 12.9% of national income-the highest share of income devoted to health in the developed world. The United States also spends more on medical research than any other country-in 2000, the federal government dedicated $18.4 billion to it, compared with only $3.7 billion for the entire European Union. In this book, leading health economists ask whether we are getting our money's worth.

From an economic perspective, they find, the answer is a resounding "yes": in fact, considering the extraordinary value of improvements to health, we may even be spending too little on medical research. The evidence these papers present and the conclusions they reach are both surprising and convincing: that growth in longevity since 1950 has been as valuable as growth in all other forms of consumption combined; that medical advances producing 10% reductions in mortality from cancer and heart disease alone would add roughly $10 trillion-a year's GDP-to the national wealth; or that the average new drug approved by the FDA yields benefits worth many times its cost of development.

The papers in this book are packed with these and many other surprising revelations, their sophisticated analysis persuasively demonstrating the massive economic benefits we can gain from investments in medical research. For anyone concerned about the cost and the value of such research-from policy makers to health care professionals and economists-this will be a landmark book.

This book introduces the basic theoretical and practical skills essential for all health care professionals. Complex issues are presented in an easy-to read and accessible format, within the context of counselling in health care environments. The first part of the book explores a range of theoretical issues relating to the nature of counselling, self-awareness and maps of the counselling process. The second part of the book considers specific counselling skills and goes on to discuss in detail the ways in which counselling skills can be learned.

Clinicians and those in health sciences are frequently called upon to measure subjective states such as attitudes, feelings, quality of life, educational achievement and aptitude, and learning style in their patients. This fifth edition of Health Measurement Scales enables these groups to both develop scales to measure non-tangible health outcomes, and better evaluate and differentiate between existing tools.

Health Measurement Scales is the ultimate guide to developing and validating measurement scales that are to be used in the health sciences. The book covers how the individual items are developed; various biases that can affect responses (e.g. social desirability, yea-saying, framing); various response options; how to select the best items in the set; how to combine them into a scale; and finally how to determine the reliability and validity of the scale. It concludes with a discussion of ethical issues that may be encountered, and guidelines for reporting the results of the scale development process. Appendices include a comprehensive guide to finding existing scales, and a brief introduction to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, making this book a must-read for any practitioner dealing with this kind of data.

Today’s complex set of moral issues involving medical research, health care, and the biological sciences can best be understood through the diverse perspectives of healthcare-providers, scientists, and others who have a vital stake in the field. Culled from the pages of the groundbreaking journal, Lahey Clinic Medical Ethics, this book offers students, healthcare professionals, and the general public insights into key ethical concepts and their practical applications through the writings of physicians, philosophers, theologians, nurses, humanists, anthropologists, psychologists, historians, policy experts, lawyers, and others.

The collection includes introductory articles by the editor, Dr. David Steinberg, that put into context the contributions by such noted experts as Jerome Kagan, Laurie Zoloth, Stuart Youngner, Daniel Callahan, Albert Jonson, George Annas, Dan Brock, Bernard Gert, Daniel Dennett, Peter Singer, Alexander Morgan Capron, and Robert Veatch. The volume includes discussions of bioethical challenges in the clinical arena; ethical challenges associated with advances in biotechnology, genetics, and reproductive medicine; legal perspectives; physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia; health policy and distributive justice; the experience of illness, and many more critical issues. Commentary on such issues from a broad range of perspectives—including debates among proponents of clashing viewpoints—adds to the book’s richness, texture, and depth.

Biomedical Ethics is an essential volume for professional schools of medicine, law, nursing, medical technology, social work, and healthcare administration, and it is an excellent supplemental text for ethics courses in philosophy, religion, sociology, and public policy.