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Prior to and during the Second World War, the Japanese Army established programs of biological warfare throughout China and elsewhere. In these “factories of death,” including the now-infamous Unit 731, Japanese doctors and scientists conducted large numbers of vivisections and experiments on human beings, mostly Chinese nationals. However, as a result of complex historical factors including an American cover-up of the atrocities, Japanese denials, and inadequate responses from successive Chinese governments, justice has never been fully served. This volume brings together the contributions of a group of scholars from different countries and various academic disciplines. It examines Japan’s wartime medical atrocities and their postwar aftermath from a comparative perspective and inquires into perennial issues of historical memory, science, politics, society and ethics elicited by these rebarbative events. The volume’s central ethical claim is that the failure to bring justice to bear on the systematic abuse of medical research by Japanese military medical personnel more than six decades ago has had a profoundly retarding influence on the development and practice of medical and social ethics in all of East Asia. The book also includes an extensive annotated bibliography selected from relevant publications in Japanese, Chinese and English.

Today’s complex set of moral issues involving medical research, health care, and the biological sciences can best be understood through the diverse perspectives of healthcare-providers, scientists, and others who have a vital stake in the field. Culled from the pages of the groundbreaking journal, Lahey Clinic Medical Ethics, this book offers students, healthcare professionals, and the general public insights into key ethical concepts and their practical applications through the writings of physicians, philosophers, theologians, nurses, humanists, anthropologists, psychologists, historians, policy experts, lawyers, and others.

The collection includes introductory articles by the editor, Dr. David Steinberg, that put into context the contributions by such noted experts as Jerome Kagan, Laurie Zoloth, Stuart Youngner, Daniel Callahan, Albert Jonson, George Annas, Dan Brock, Bernard Gert, Daniel Dennett, Peter Singer, Alexander Morgan Capron, and Robert Veatch. The volume includes discussions of bioethical challenges in the clinical arena; ethical challenges associated with advances in biotechnology, genetics, and reproductive medicine; legal perspectives; physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia; health policy and distributive justice; the experience of illness, and many more critical issues. Commentary on such issues from a broad range of perspectives—including debates among proponents of clashing viewpoints—adds to the book’s richness, texture, and depth.

Biomedical Ethics is an essential volume for professional schools of medicine, law, nursing, medical technology, social work, and healthcare administration, and it is an excellent supplemental text for ethics courses in philosophy, religion, sociology, and public policy.

Ethics in Health Administration translates the principles and practice of ethics into usable information for application to the real world of health care administration. Based on a model that centers on the administrators’ role in practice-based ethics, this text also recognizes influences that impact their ethics in decision making. Fictional cases based on real world events help to emphasize chapter content and make it interesting for the learner. Each chapter contains at least two cases for class discussion, as well as references and websites. The Second Edition is a thorough revision that includes urther clarification of terms, new cases, new information on patient-centered care, new information on disaster planning, new material on the culture of compassion, updated instructor resources, and more.

We like to imagine that medicine is based on evidence and the results of fair testing and clinical trials. In reality, those tests and trials are often profoundly flawed. We like to imagine that doctors who write prescriptions for everything from antidepressants to cancer drugs to heart medication are familiar with the research literature about a drug, when in reality much of the research is hidden from them by drug companies. We like to imagine that doctors are impartially educated, when in reality much of their education is funded by the pharmaceutical industry. We like to imagine that regulators have some code of ethics and let only effective drugs onto the market, when in reality they approve useless drugs, with data on side effects casually withheld from doctors and patients.
All these problems have been shielded from public scrutiny because they're too complex to capture in a sound bite. But Ben Goldacre shows that the true scale of this murderous disaster fully reveals itself only when the details are untangled. He believes we should all be able to understand precisely how data manipulation works and how research misconduct in the medical industry affects us on a global scale.
With Goldacre's characteristic flair and a forensic attention to detail, Bad Pharma reveals a shockingly broken system and calls for regulation. This is the pharmaceutical industry as it has never been seen before.

It is estimated that up to thirteen percent of hospital admissions result from the adverse effects of diagnosis or treatment, and that anywhere from 44,000 to 98,000 hospital deaths annually are the result of errors. The obligation to "do no harm" has been central to medical conduct since ancient times, yet iatrogenic illness and medical error have now come to be recognized as significant risk factors in health care delivery. This book integrates history, philosophy, medical ethics and empirical data to examine the concept and phenomenon of medical harm. Issues covered include medical error, appropriateness of care, acceptable risk and practitioner accountability, and recommendations for limiting iatrogenic harm.

A physician says, "I have an ethical obligation never to cause the death of a patient," another responds, "My ethical obligation is to relieve pain even if the patient dies." The current argument over the role of physicians in assisting patients to die constantly refers to the ethical duties of the profession. References to the Hippocratic Oath are often heard. Many modern problems, from assisted suicide to accessible health care, raise questions about the traditional ethics of medicine and the medical profession. However, few know what the traditional ethics are and how they came into being. This book provides a brief tour of the complex story of medical ethics evolved over centuries in both Western and Eastern culture. It sets this story in the social and cultural contexts in which the work of healing was practiced and suggests that, behind the many different perceptions about the ethical duties of physicians, certain themes appear constantly, and may be relevant to modern debates. The book begins with the Hippocratic medicine of ancient Greece, moves through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Enlightenment in Europe, and the long history of Indian 7nd Chinese medicine, ending as the problems raised modern medical science and technology challenge the settled ethics of the long tradition.

As a healthcare practitioner, you will face a broad range of professional
dilemmas in your everyday practice. From seeking consent to upholding
patient confidentiality, you'll rely on your knowledge of ethics, the law
and professional codes of conduct to guide your actions. Balancing these
three strands can be difficult, but with detailed scenarios and accessible
discussion, this book guides you through the complexities of practice.

Taking a practice-based approach, the text explores the combination of
ethical, legal and professional issues which characterise the field of
healthcare. A range of experienced contributors come together to
provide:
■ detailed analysis of confidentiality, accountability, consent, capacity
and justice, all grounded within the daily practice context;
■ authoritative guidance through discussion of legal cases, excerpts
from statutes and extracts from professional guidelines;
■ realistic scenarios drawn from a range of health settings, unravelling
and illustrating the guidelines, statutes and policies which influence
practice;
■ advice on balancing the conflicting pressures of the modern healthcare
context, from facing time limitations to challenging the unprofessional
practice of others.

Ethics, Law and Professional Issues puts you at the centre of some of a
practitioner's most difficult decisions. It is therefore an essential resource
for any student of healthcare looking to develop an ethically, legally
and professionally sound approach to practice.

A comprehensive book dealing with the ethical challenges confronting occupational health professionals, particularly focusing on the ethical issues inherent in the practical problems that they encounter in their everyday work. Provides all the practical tools required for the ethical analysis of challenging and complex cases, and situations that require well-reflected professional decisions. Includes case studies that will help provide information and guidance that can also be used in vocational and postgraduate training programs. Occupational health physicians, nurses, hygienists, psychologists, and managers of occupational health practices will find this book valuable reading.

As we are increasingly using new technologies to change ourselves beyond therapy and in accordance with our own desires, understanding the challenges of human enhancement has become one of the most urgent topics of the current age. This volume contributes to such an understanding by critically examining the pros and cons of our growing ability to shape human nature through technological advancements. The authors undertake careful analyses of decisive questions that will confront society as enhancement interventions using bio-, info-, neuro- and nanotechnologies become widespread in the years to come. They provide the reader with the conceptual tools necessary to address such questions fruitfully. What makes the book especially attractive is the combination of conceptual, historical and ethical approaches, which makes it highly original. In addition, the well-balanced structure of the volume allows both favourable and critical views to be voiced. Moreover, the work has a crystal clear structure. As a consequence, the book is accessible to a broad academic audience. The issues raised are of interest to a wide reflective public concerned about science and ethics, as well as to students, academics and professionals in areas such as philosophy, applied ethics, bioethics, medicine and health management.