PDF Guide Free

Download PDF Guide Free

The issues constituting the history of medicine are consequential: how societies organize health care, how individuals or states relate to sickness, how we understand our own identity and agency as sufferers or healers. In Locating Medical History: The Stories and Their Meanings, Frank Huisman, John Harley Warner, and other eminent historians explore and reflect on a field that accommodates a remarkable diversity of practitioners and approaches.

At a time when medical history is facing profound choices about its future, these scholars explore the discipline in the distant and recent past in order to rethink its missions and methods today. They discuss such issues as the periodic estrangement of medical history from medicine, the influence of Foucault on the writing of medical history, and the shifts from social to cultural history and back again. Chapters explore the early history of the field, its transformations since the 1970s, and its prospects for the future.

With diverse constituencies, a multiplicity of approaches, styles, and aims is both expected and desired. This volume locates medical history within itself and within larger historiographic trends, to provide a springboard for discussions about what the history of medicine should be, and what aims it should serve.

Contributors: Olga Amsterdamska, University of Amsterdam; Warwick Anderson, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Allan M. Brandt, Harvard Medical School; Theodore M. Brown, University of Rochester; Roger Cooter, University College London; Martin Dinges, Institut für Geschichte der Medizin der Robert Bosch Stiftung; Alice Domurat Dreger, Michigan State University; Jacalyn Duffin, Queen's University; Elizabeth Fee, National Library of Medicine; Mary E. Fissell, The Johns Hopkins University; Danielle Gourevitch, École Pratique des Hautes Études; Anja Hiddinga, University of Amsterdam; Ludmilla Jordanova, University of East Anglia; Alfons Labisch, Heinrich-Heine-University; Hans-Uwe Lammel, University of Rostock; Sherwin B. Nuland, Yale University; Vivian Nutton, University College London; Roy Porter, formerly University College London; Susan M. Reverby. Wellesley College; David Rosner, Columbia University; Thomas Rütten, University of Newcastle upon Tyne; Heinz-Peter Schmiedebach, University of Greifswald; Christiane Sinding, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale

During the American Civil War, disease and infection, caused by poor medical care and lack of proper hygiene, were the main causes of death to both Confederate and Union soldiers. Why, then, were there no adequate facilities to care for these men? That is the question Cordelia Harvey sought to answer. Join author Daniel L. Stika as he examines the work of Wisconsin's Nightingale, Cordelia Harvey. As a tireless campaigner for improved medical care for Civil War soldiers, Harvey inspects battlefield hospitals and takes her reports of squalor and death all the way To The White House. Throughout the course of several meetings with President Abraham Lincoln, Harvey advocates For The construction of hospitals with the sole purpose of caring For The men who are fighting and dying for their country. Though Lincoln is reticent to hear her requests, Harvey's fervor for her cause and her passionate arguments ultimately lead the president to make a decision that will save the lives of innumerable soldiers. When Lincoln met Wisconsin's Nightingale presents the life of an extraordinary woman who battled adversity and tragedy in her quest to provide care to those who needed it most.