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During the nineteenth century, the provision of medical care underwent a radical transformation. In 1800, the body was still understood in terms of humours and fluids, and treatment was provided by a wide range of individuals, some of whom had little or no formal training. Institutions were marginal to the medical enterprise, and governments took almost no part in providing medical services. By 1930, however, a recognisably modern medicine had begun to emerge across Europe. New understandings of human physiology had resulted in the new science of surgical therapy; hospitals had become centres for care, research and training; and the newly organised medical professions increasingly sought to regulate medical practice. In most countries, the state had accepted responsibility for public health and the provision of basic welfare services.

This volume provides readers with unrivalled access to a comprehensive range of sources on these major themes. Extracts from contemporary writings vividly illustrate key aspects of medical thought and practice, while a selection of classic historical research and up-to-date work in the field helps further our understanding of medical history. Thematically arranged, these sources are assembled to complement the essays in the companion volume, Medicine Transformed: Health, Disease and Society in Europe, 1800-1930. In addition, brief scholarly introductions make the sources accessible to both the specialist and the general reader.

During the nineteenth century medicine underwent a radical transformation. In 1800, the body was still understood in terms of humors and fluids, and a wide range of individuals provided medical care. Institutions were marginal to the medical enterprise, and governments took almost no part in providing medical services. By 1930 a new modern medicine had begun to emerge across Europe. New understandings of the body opened up surgery and treatments, and hospitals became centers for care, research and training. In Medicine Transformed, original essays by established scholars in the social history of medicine explore these developments and examine topics such as the military and colonial medicine, the role of women and access to care. The essays provide an accessible introduction to the subject, setting nineteenth and early twentieth-century medicine in its political, cultural, intellectual and economic contexts.

Medicine transformed is complemented by a companion volume of primary and secondary readings: Health, disease and society in Europe, 1800-1930: A source book.