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Provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of fuzziness together with a compilation of recent advances in the application to medicine. The tutorials in the first part of the book range from basic concepts through theoretical frameworks to rule simplification through data clustering methodologies and the design of multivariate rule bases through self-learning by mapping fuzzy systems onto neural network structures. The case studies which follow are representative of the wide range of applications currently pursued in relation to medicine. The majority of applications presented in this book are about bridging the gap between low-level sensor measurements and intermediate or high-level data representations. The book offers a comprehensive perspective from leading authorities world-wide and provides a tantalising glimpse into the role of sophisticated knowledge engineering methods in shaping the landscape of medical technology in the future.

To say that Fuzzy Logic in Medicine, or FLM for short, is an important addi tion to the literature of fuzzy logic and its applications, is an understatement. Edited by two prominent informaticians, Professors S. Barro and R. Marin, it is one of the first books in its field. Between its covers, FLM presents authoritative expositions of a wide spectrum of medical and biological ap plications of fuzzy logic, ranging from image classification and diagnostics to anaesthesia control and risk assessment of heart diseases. As the editors note in the preface, recognition of the relevance of fuzzy set theory and fuzzy logic to biological and medical systems has a long history. In this context, particularly worthy of note is the pioneering work of Profes sor Klaus Peter Adlassnig of the University of Vienna School of Medicine. However, it is only within the past decade that we began to see an accelerat ing growth in the visibility and importance of publications falling under the rubric of fuzzy logic in medicine and biology -a leading example of which is the Journal of the Biomedical Fuzzy Systems Association in Japan. Why did it take so long for this to happen? First, a bit of history.

The two-volume set LNCS 3749 and LNCS 3750 constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2005, held in Palm Springs, CA, USA, in October 2005. Based on rigorous peer reviews the program committee selected 237 carefully revised full papers from 632 submissions for presentation in two volumes. The first volume includes all the contributions related to image analysis and validation, vascular image segmentation, image registration, diffusion tensor image analysis, image segmentation and analysis, clinical applications - validation, imaging systems - visualization, computer assisted diagnosis, cellular and molecular image analysis, physically-based modeling, robotics and intervention, medical image computing for clinical applications, and biological imaging - simulation and modeling. The second volume collects the papers related to robotics, image-guided surgery and interventions, image registration, medical image computing, structural and functional brain analysis, model-based image analysis, image-guided intervention: simulation, modeling and display, and image segmentation and analysis.

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Information Processing in Medical Imaging, IPMI 2001, held in Davis, CA, USA, in June 2001.
The 54 revised papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 78 submissions. The papers are organized in topical sections on objective assessment of image quality, shape modeling, molecular and diffusion tensor imaging, registration and structural analysis, functional image analysis, fMRI/EEG/MEG, deformable registration, shape analysis, and analysis of brain structure.

Cognitive science is a multidisciplinary science concerned with understanding and utilizing models of cognition. It has spawned a great dealof research on applications such as expert systems and intelligent tutoring systems, and has interacted closely with psychological research. However, it is generally accepted that it is difficult to apply cognitive-scientific models to medical training and practice. This book is based on a NATO Advanced Research Workshop held in Italy in 1991, the purpose of which was to examine the impact ofmodels of cognition on medical training and practice and to outline future research programmes relating cognition and education, and in particular to consider the potential impact of cognitive science on medical training and practice. A major discovery presented in the book is that the research areas related to artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, and medical decision making are considerably closer, both conceptually and theoretically, than many of the workshop participants originally thought.