PDF Guide Free

Download PDF Guide Free

From the San Diego wildfires to multi-drug-resistant strains of bacteria, communities are facing an ever-growing list of potential disasters. Some events, like pandemic flu or anthrax attacks, are public health emergencies first and foremost. Hurricane Katrina taught us, however, that lack of planning for the frail, elderly, and impoverished population can turn a natural disaster into a healthcare nightmare and lead to needless death and suffering. Emergency managers and public health professionals must integrate their prevention and response efforts to serve their communities most effectively. The structure of each chapter offers an innovative approach to organizing key information: 1. Case Study or Historical Example 2. Disaster-specific Terms Defined 3. Disaster Description 4. Health Threat (Morbidity and Mortality) 5. Prevention 6. Immediate Actions 7. Recovery or Managing the Aftermath 8. Summary Disasters and Public Health is a crucial tool in planning for and responding to the health impact of any crisis situation. Bruce Clements served over 20 years in the U.S. Air Force and Air National Guard as a Public Health Officer and a Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Warfare Defense Instructor, a Hazardous Materials Specialist with an Urban Search and Rescue Team, and as a Safety Officer with a Disaster Medical Assistance Team. He also served as the Public Health Preparedness Director of Missouri in 2006, when the state experienced a record number of disaster declarations. Throughout his years of experience, he frequently needed to track down a variety of references to quickly understand what was needed for an effective public health response in various situations. He has researched and compiled this information on the health impact of a wide range of disasters into one quick reference. Emergency managers can also no longer afford to be surprised by the next crisis that erupts. This book guides planners in both disciplines in preventing tragedies by most effectively preparing and responding when disaster strikes.



* Prevent or respond to disasters from terrorism to pandemic flu
* Examine the critical intersection of emergency management and public health
* Benefit from the author's years of experience in emergency response

The definitive story of American health care today--its causes, consequences, and confusions

In March 2010, the Affordable Care Act was signed into law. It was the most extensive reform of America’s health care system since at least the creation of Medicare in 1965, and maybe ever. The ACA was controversial and highly political, and the law faced legal challenges reaching all the way to the Supreme Court; it even precipitated a government shutdown. It was a signature piece of legislation for President Obama’s first term, and also a ball and chain for his second.

Ezekiel J. Emanuel, a professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania who also served as a special adviser to the White House on health care reform, has written a brilliant diagnostic explanation of why health care in America has become such a divisive social issue, how money and medicine have their own--quite distinct--American story, and why reform has bedeviled presidents of the left and right for more than one hundred years.
Emanuel also explains exactly how the ACA reforms are reshaping the health care system now. He forecasts the future, identifying six mega trends in health that will determine the market for health care to 2020 and beyond. His predictions are bold, provocative, and uniquely well-informed. Health care--one of America’s largest employment sectors, with an economy the size of the GDP of France--has never had a more comprehensive or authoritative interpreter.

As a toast to success, a drowning of sorrows, a rite of passage, and the fuel for most social activities, alcohol plays a central role in our culture. Alcohol generates nearly $160 billion in US revenues annually and is a major source of tax revenue, making the stakes in the modern debate over its use, misuse, and regulation staggeringly high. Factor in the costs of alcohol-related illness and addiction, alcohol-related deaths, evolving social mores, legal precedents, and increasingly aggressive advertising and marketing and an already controversial subject becomes a heated, vigorous, and complicated battle.

Synthesizing the divergent, interdisciplinary perspectives on alcohol sales, regulation, and consumption into a cohesive whole, Social and Economic Control of Alcohol: The 21st Amendment in the 21st Century draws on the expertise of key academic and legal figures to become the seminal volume in this burgeoning field of inquiry. Amidst a rapidly changing milieu of regulations, cultures, and emotions, it objectively re-examines issues surrounding the regulation and sale of alcohol with unparalleled breadth, depth, and unbiased focus.

The book examines the foundation and basis for our current regulatory policy and how that foundation has shifted dramatically with changes in the law, marketing, consumer influence, and the impact of alcohol on society. With strong and relevant comparisons to historical studies and evaluations of past legislation, this book presents a critical analysis and definition of concepts and applications regarding alcohol control.

Double-blind, peer-reviewed contributions outline specific concerns related to the development of new laws and policies, and consider how those policies may affect individuals, organizations, law, and society in general. Highlighting current findings and trends, this volume allows for a better understanding of the potential correlation and causal relationship between regulation, sales, and consumption patterns.

The definitive story of American health care today—its causes, consequences, and confusions

In March 2010, the Affordable Care Act was signed into law. It was the most extensive reform of America’s health care system since at least the creation of Medicare in 1965, and maybe ever. The ACA was controversial and highly political, and the law faced legal challenges reaching all the way to the Supreme Court; it even precipitated a government shutdown. It was a signature piece of legislation for President Obama’s first term, and also a ball and chain for his second.

Ezekiel J. Emanuel, a professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania who also served as a special adviser to the White House on health care reform, has written a brilliant diagnostic explanation of why health care in America has become such a divisive social issue, how money and medicine have their own—quite distinct—American story, and why reform has bedeviled presidents of the left and right for more than one hundred years.
Emanuel also explains exactly how the ACA reforms are reshaping the health care system now. He forecasts the future, identifying six mega trends in health that will determine the market for health care to 2020 and beyond. His predictions are bold, provocative, and uniquely well-informed. Health care—one of America’s largest employment sectors, with an economy the size of the GDP of France—has never had a more comprehensive or authoritative interpreter.