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Public Health

Emphasizing the importance of social context and cultural construction, Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health examines current issues in health from a social and behavioral sciences perspective. The book uses a social ecological framework to address multilevel influences on health and enlarge the dominant "risk factor" approach to health behavior. Editor Jeannine Coreil and contributing authors use examples from the forefront of public health to illustrate the relevance of “core“competencies” in the field to diverse real-world problems. The Second Edition has been thoroughly updated and revised throughout, based on user feedback, and includes new theory, research, case studies.

Key Features:

  • Applies the social ecology of health model to contemporary issues at the individual and group level
  • Draws from a wide range of disciplines, including medical sociology, health psychology, medical anthropology, demography, gerontology, and economics
  • Describes planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health programs, policies, and interventions
  • Features engaging case studies and examples on topics such as HIV/AIDS and breast cancer
  • Includes new “Special Topics” section, with chapters on childhood obesity, injury prevention, and occupational health
  • Offers practical advice for students and practitioners interested in updating their knowledge and skills”


Social and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health is intended as a core textbook for graduate courses in public health and health care management that examine current issues in health from a social and behavioral sciences perspective.

Each topical chapter in this volume crystallizes the findings of a five-year study, under the auspices of the Population Health Program of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, that probed the links between social hierarchy, the “macroenvironmental” factors in illness patterns, the quality of the “microenvironmental,” and other determinants of health. In its aggregate, this volume will prove essential to an understanding of the underlying public health issues for the next several decades.

Now in its Fifth Edition, this best-selling text offers comprehensive coverage of all the major topics in introductory epidemiology. With extensive treatment of the heart of epidemiology—from study designs to descriptive epidemiology to quantitative measures—this reader-friendly text is accessible and interesting to a wide range of beginning students in all health-related disciplines. A unique focus is given to real-world applications of epidemiology and the development of skills that students can apply in subsequent course work and in the field. The Fifth Edition is a thorough revision with updated data throughout including: the top 10 leading causes of death, motor vehicle traffic death rates, mortality ratios, infant mortality rates, cancer deaths rates, tuberculosis incidence, life expectancy, incidence of AIDS, breast cancer death rates, tobacco consumption, dementia, suicide rates, unintentional injuries and much more.

How do new diseases become part of the public health agenda? Emerging Illnesses and Society brings together historians, sociologists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and others to explore this vital issue. Contributors describe the processes by which patients' groups interact with medical researchers, public health institutions, and the media to identify and address previously unknown illnesses, including multiple sclerosis, Tourette syndrome, AIDS, lead poisoning, Lyme disease, and hepatitis C. The introductory chapter develops a general theoretical model of the social process of "emerging"illness, identifying critical epidemiologic, social and political factors that shape different trajectories toward the construction of public health priorities. Through case studies of individual diseases and analyses of public awareness campaigns and institutional responses, this timely volume provides important insights into the medical, social, and economic factors that determine why some illnesses receive more attention and funding than others.

Contributors: Deborah Barrett, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Steven Epstein, University of California, San Diego; Phyllis Freeman, University of Massachusetts, Boston; Diane E. Goldstein, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Peter J. Krause, University of Connecticut School of Medicine; Howard I. Kushner, Emory University; Lawrence D. Mass, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York; Michelle Murphy, University of Toronto; Lydia Ogden, Global AIDS Program, CDCR; Sandy Smith-Nonini, Elon University; Ellen Griffith Spears, Southern Regional Council; Andrew Spielman, Harvard School of Public Health; Colin Talley, University of California San Francisco; Sam R. Telford III, Harvard School of Public Health; Christian Warren, New York Academy of Medicine.

The New Public Health has established itself as a solid textbook throughout the world. Translated into 7 languages, TNPH distinguishes itself from other public health textbooks, which are either highly locally oriented or, if international, lack the specificity of local issues relevant to students' understanding of applied public health in their own setting. This textbook offers students both a comprehensive overview of public health theories as well as in-depth topical chapters, separately presenting special areas of public health practice applied to local settings and case studies. Following the "gold standard" of knowledge set by the Council for Education in Public Health, the new edition includes:

* 40% of new material, including all new tables, figures, data, and chapter bibliographies
* Updates based on the 2005 accreditation criteria of the Council for Education in Public Health (CEPH), as will feedback received from an extensive survey of professors using NPH1
* Multiple case studies, chapter-ending bibliographies, and "recommended readings"
* Companion web site features an Instructors' Guide, PowerPoint lectures slides by the authors on topics related to the chapters, Case Studies, and Links to key websites for continuous updating of material for study and research


The second edition of NPH provides a unified approach to public health appropriate for all masters' level students and practitioners – specifically for courses in MPH programs, community health and preventive medicine programs, community health education programs, community health nursing programs, as well as programs for other medical professionals such as pharmacy, physiotherapy, and other public health courses. Specific courses include: Fundamentals of Public Health, Introduction to Public Health Policy, Philosophy of Public Health, History of Public Health, Public Health and Healthcare Management, New Technologies and Public Health, Genetics and Biotechnologies, Bio-preparedness and others.

* 40% new material, including all new tables, figures, data, and chapter bibliographies
* Updates based on the 2005 accreditation criteria of the Council for Education in Public Health (CEPH)
* Multiple case studies, chapter-ending bibliographies, and "recommended readings"
* Includes detailed companion website featuring and instructors' guide, PowerPoint slides, case studies and much more

"Schneider and Lilienfeld have provided a volume that is sorely needed for all students of public health. The articles included are an excellent sampling of the classic studies and detail the development and evolution of public health."-Manning Feinleib, professor of epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health "A valuable book for the rapidly growing number of students in graduate and undergraduate schools and programs of public health. The editors are to be commended for their text selection and insightful comments that help frame the material."-Bernard Goldstein, former dean, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health Public health as a discipline grew out of traditional Western medicine but expanded to include interests in social policy, hygiene, epidemiology, infectious disease, sanitation, and health education. This book, the first of a two-volume set, is a collection of important and representative historical texts that serve to trace and to illuminate the development of conceptions, policies, and treatments in public health from the dawn of Western civilization through the Progressive Era of the early twentieth century. The editors provide annotated readings and biographical details to punctuate the historical timeline and to provide students with insights into the progression of ideas, initiatives, and reforms in the field. From Hippocrates and John Graunt in the early period, to John Snow and Florence Nightingale during the nineteenth-century sanitary reform movement, to Upton Sinclair and Margaret Sanger in the Progressive Era, readers follow the identification, evolution, and implementation of public health concepts as they came together under one discipline. Dona Schneider, Ph.D., M.P.H., is a professor and the director of Undergraduate Programs at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University. David E. Lilienfeld, M.D., M.P.H., is senior director for product safety at FibroGen, Inc. in South San Francisco, California.

This paperback edition of George Rosen's classic account of the history of public health supplements the original text with Elizabeth Fee's introduction and Edward T. Morman's biographical essay and bibliography.

Prior to and during the Second World War, the Japanese Army established programs of biological warfare throughout China and elsewhere. In these “factories of death,” including the now-infamous Unit 731, Japanese doctors and scientists conducted large numbers of vivisections and experiments on human beings, mostly Chinese nationals. However, as a result of complex historical factors including an American cover-up of the atrocities, Japanese denials, and inadequate responses from successive Chinese governments, justice has never been fully served. This volume brings together the contributions of a group of scholars from different countries and various academic disciplines. It examines Japan’s wartime medical atrocities and their postwar aftermath from a comparative perspective and inquires into perennial issues of historical memory, science, politics, society and ethics elicited by these rebarbative events. The volume’s central ethical claim is that the failure to bring justice to bear on the systematic abuse of medical research by Japanese military medical personnel more than six decades ago has had a profoundly retarding influence on the development and practice of medical and social ethics in all of East Asia. The book also includes an extensive annotated bibliography selected from relevant publications in Japanese, Chinese and English.